Three Questions to Help You Determine Who to Hire

How do you decide who to hire and who to partner with? As a leader, these decisions are crucial. We must get them right. The next time you are in a position to hire someone, consider passing all of your interview questions through these three filters.

who-to-hire

1—The Customer Test: “Would I like this person to be my nurse?”

I am using nursing here, but you can adapt this question to fit whatever position you are trying to fill. So, imagine you are the customer and answer this question is about the candidate you are interviewing. If your answer is yes, in essence you are saying that you would trust this person in two areas:

  • As a professional. Guide your questions and your search to ascertain whether this person has the right credentials and experience to do the job. You may have to provide a test for them to take, evaluate their skills, or solicit certifications they should have for the position.
  • As someone who excels in customer service. Again as a customer, would you want to be the recipient of this person’s care and service? Are they smiling in the interview? Are they kind? Are they knowledgeable?

2—The Friend Test: “Would I like this person to be my friend?”

If I believe I can be friends with this person, and more specifically, that I can spend an evening chatting with this person, this answers these two questions:

  • What is our ability to connect? Sometimes we seem to connect effortlessly with others. We have chemistry. We laugh at each other’s jokes and discuss both simple and deep topics with ease. This natural connection is hard to manufacture. If you feel a connection with a person who is about to work for you, or be a part of your team, most likely you will be effective with them because you already like to be together.
  • What is our ability to communicate? Another trait of a solid friendship is the mutual ability to communicate with one another. If you have the feeling during the interview that communication seems to be easy, pay close attention to this candidate. Good communication skills are an important characteristic to have in a team member.

3—The Boss Test: “Would I like for this person to be my boss?”

If I am about to hire a nurse, and I think that he or she can be my boss, this speaks volumes in two specific areas:

  • Their Grace: I believe people want to work for bosses who are gracious, who don’t see their role as a condemner, but rather a supporter; not as a controller, but instead as one who empowers others. Grace offers us unmerited favor, and we are all in need of that, especially from those who have authority over us. But why is grace important in this situation? This person is not going to be your boss. It’s critical because if this person passes the litmus test of being gracious enough to be your boss, then certainly they would be gracious enough to be a team member.
  • Their Maturity: I define maturity as the ability to control one’s emotions, direct one’s thoughts, and restrain one’s tongue when things go wrong or when they don’t feel well. We all want to work with such a person. Again, if the person we are interviewing passes the test of having enough maturity of be our boss, I bet is they would certainly be mature enough to be on our team.

Let’s face it, people put their best face forward when they are interviewing for a job. We should listen to their answers, but we know those can be rehearsed. What cannot be rehearsed is what is not being said. It is the feeling you get from talking to them—their body language for example, and many other intangible, subconscious ways humans assess each other. If an interviewee cannot pass these three questions above, I would not move forward to bring them onto your team.

(Watch my video below if you prefer to see me teach about this subject.)

Your Friend,
Wes Saade MD Signature

For Further Reading:

Recruiting Ideal Players for Your Team
The Speed Dating Interview

 

Tags:
No Comments

Post A Comment